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A Catalog of Birds @ CSS: Home

Welcome

A Catalog of Birds
@The College of St. Scholastica

Male Mourning Warbler found near Lot 15 on June 20, 2020. Photo by Brad Snelling. 

Welcome to A Catalog of Birds at the College of St. Scholastica: an ongoing, interdisciplinary project initiated by the CSS Library which focuses on bird species found on our Duluth campus. The heart of this project is a species list which was developed by faculty emerita Sr. Donna Schroeder from 1978 until 1996. With her permission, we have updated this list with species which have been found on campus since 2005, including birds seen on library-sponsored campus walks with local ornithologists Laura Erickson and Kim Eckert. Our current focus for this project is to develop a digital collection of photographs and sound recordings of birds as they are seen and heard on our campus. We also hope to highlight interdisciplinary work in science, art and music.

 

A Species List for CSS

Sketch of Common Raven by Todd White

Common Raven by T. White. Please do not use without permission.

At the heart of our project is a campus species list which was kept by faculty emerita Sr. Donna Schroeder and her students for her course on bird identification at The College of St. Scholastica from 1978 to 1996. With her permission, we have updated the list with select sightings from 2005 to 2018, including species which were identified on campus walks led by ornithologists Laura Erickson and Kim Eckert. In 2019, we resumed keeping an annual list as part of this record.

View the campus species list.

 

How does that song go?

Common Yellowthroat

Field guides to birds typically include a mnemonic which can be used to identify and learn the songs of individual species. The song of the Common Yellowthroat (pictured above near his nest by the community garden), is often described in modern guides with the mnemonic "witchety, witchety, witchety!" Many older guides, such as Ferdinand Schuyler Matthews' Field Book of Wild Birds and Their Music (1909), describe the song as "witchery, witchery, witchery!" Mathews also suggests the possibility of "Witch-way-sir, Witch-way-sir, Witch-way-sir." Our favorite interpretation of the song comes in a 1837 journal entry from Ralph Waldo Emerson who describes a Yellowthroat which "pipes to me all day long" with the song: "Extacy, Extacy, Extacy!"

What do you think? Here's a recording of a Common Yellowthroat singing near Lot 15 last summer.

A Gallery of Campus Birds

American Redstart

American Redstart

Seen near drive below Science Building on June 22, 2020.

Black-throated Green Warbler seen near overlook to Valley of Silence. June 20, 2020.

Black-throated Green Warbler

Seen near overlook to Valley of Silence. June 20, 2020.

Yellow Warber seen near lower lots on June 14, 2020.

Yellow Warbler

Seen near Lot 6A on June 14, 2020.

Chipping Sparrow

Seen near Cedar Hall on June 19, 2020.

Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

Near the community garden. June 19, 2020.

Song Sparrow near Gethsemane Cemetery on June 13, 2020.

Song Sparrow

Seen in a field of wild lupine near Gethsemane Cemetery on June 13, 2020.

Eastern Wood Peewee seen near overlook to Valley of Silence on June 14, 2020.

Eastern Wood Peewee

Found near overlook to Valley of Silence on June 14, 2020.

Black-throated Green Warbler

Black-throated Green Warbler

Singing into the Valley of Silence. June 20, 2020.

Northern Flicker near Lot 15 on June 13, 2020.

Northern Flicker

Pictured near Lot 15 on June 13, 2020.

American Redstart near overlook to Valley of Silence, June 15, 2020.

American Redstart

Found near overlook to Valley of Silence, June 15, 2020.

Eastern Phoebe seen near Lot 6A on June 14, 2020.

Eastern Phoebe

Seen near Lot 6A on June 14, 2020.

American Redstart near the entry of Gethsemane Cemetery.

American Redstart

Pictured near the entry of Gethsemane Cemetery.

Mourning Warbler

Mourning Warbler

Found near Lot 15 on June 20, 2020.

Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

Near Lot 1 on June 21, 2020.

Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

Seen near Chester Creek and the community garden on June 21, 2020.

Birds in Art

Sketch of birds from Ceylon Pot


Sketch of George Bain's sketch of "an Eastern Relative of the Bird in Pictish Art (with interlacing necks and topknots) From earthenware pot, modern, Kandy, Ceylon. Berlin Ethnological Museum." Bain, George. Celtic Art: The Methods of Construction. New York: Dover, 1973. p. 105.

Image by T. White. Please do not use without permission.

Dr. Nicholas Susi Plays Ravel

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Maurice Ravel described his Oiseaux Tristes (translated "Sad Birds") as "birds lost in the torpor of a very dark forest during the hottest hours of summer." The work is heard here in a performance by our talented colleague, Dr. Nicholas Susi, an Assistant Professor of Music at CSS.

CSS Bird in Profile!

 

Photo of Red-bellied Woodpecker courtesy of Laura Erickson.

Last spring, we had our first record of a Red-bellied Woodpecker which was seen and heard in the Gethsemane Cemetery on June 2, 2019. In this brief recording, you can hear the woodpecker's shrill call along with the tolling of the chapel bell. The species has been seen and heard on campus several times since.
 

Recording of Red-bellied Woodpecker, Gethsemane Cemetery, June 2, 2019.