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About The College of St. Scholastica Library: Library Policies

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Policies of The College of St. Scholastica Library

Collection Development at The College of St. Scholastica Library

This policy is intended to assist librarians at the College of St. Scholastica (CSS) collaborating with faculty to work towards defined goals in shaping the CSS Library collection.

The CSS Library serves the students, faculty, and staff of the College of St. Scholastica across all campuses and all formats. The primary emphasis of the Library’s collection is on student learning – complementing, supplementing, and reflecting the curricula taught within the academic programs at CSS. Collection development is more than simply purchasing materials for use by the CSS community; it also embraces an understanding of the access and use of materials in the collection and analysis of the overall quality of resources.

Mission and Role of the Library
The CSS Library is vital to scholarship and a sense of community for all students, faculty and staff. As both a physical and virtual space, it serves the Mission of the College by providing instruction, services, and access to resources that support the teaching mission of the College and foster independent intellectual inquiry. The Library supplements and enhances course-related instruction, providing a bridge to the kind of independent learning and critical thinking skills graduates will rely upon in their future personal and professional lives.

Vision
As a vital part of the academic community the CSS Library will play a central role in the realization of the College’s vision. It will strive to preserve, disseminate and instruct in the retrieval and use of knowledge in order to provide faculty, staff and students with the framework to realize the College’s and Library’s missions.


Intellectual Freedom
The Library, like the College, was founded in the Catholic, Benedictine tradition. As such it is committed to developing and providing access to a collection representing a diversity of views. It is this sort of diverse collection that fosters intellectual inquiry and develops critical thinking skills. The development of library collections in support of an institution’s instruction and research programs should transcend the personal values of the selector. In the interests of research and learning, it is essential that collections contain materials representing a variety of perspectives on subjects that may, at times, be considered controversial.

The Library also adheres to the academic library interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights as articulated by the American Library Association (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill):


The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

VII. All people, regardless of origin, age, background, or views, possess a right to privacy and confidentiality in their library use. Libraries should advocate for, educate about, and protect people’s privacy, safeguarding all library use data, including personally identifiable information.

Challenges to the Collection
In the event that someone objects to certain materials in the Library collection, a complaint may be reported to the Collection Development Librarian. The Collection Development Librarian, in consultation with other librarians, will attempt to resolve the issue; however, the material will remain available on the shelf until a final determination has been made by the Collection Development Librarian or Director of the Library if necessary.

Goals for the Collection
1. Support current curricular and research needs of students and faculty. The primary goal is to support the curricular and research needs of all CSS students in their areas of primary and secondary study. Faculty research will also be supported when possible to do so without compromising the Library’s commitment to student learning. The Library is not a research level library committed to collecting extensively in all subject areas. That fact, coupled with budgetary and space constraints, means we are not able to meet faculty research needs comprehensively. The primary means of support for faculty research lies with the Interlibrary Loan service.

2. Support life-long learning for the CSS community. One of the values of CSS is that learning does not stop when one graduates, it is, in fact, an ongoing process throughout one’s life. The Library’s collection, therefore, will support the personal, social, and extracurricular needs of the CSS community as the budget permits.

3. Participate as a member of library consortia arrangements through a commitment to shared collection development and interlibrary loan. A library consortium can bring collective purchasing power to its members as well as access to additional collections to our users. Along with these benefits comes the responsibility of participating in shared collection development projects and a willingness to make our resources available to other institutions. CSS partners with several networks/consortia: MnPALS, Minitex, and OCLC.
 

Collection Guidelines
1. Curriculum support. All materials to be added to the Library will support the curricula of the current academic programs at CSS or otherwise contribute to the CSS community’s intellectual, spiritual, or cultural development or enrichment.

2. Budget allocation. The Library’s overall budget is made up of two sources, a capital budget out of which monographs, audio visual, and periodical purchases are made, and an operating budget for electronic resource subscriptions. Each year the Library allocates a portion of the capital budget to academic departments for use by the faculty to develop a portion of the collection in support of their curricula. Recommendations from the CSS faculty may be denied if, in the opinion of the Library, they do not adhere to the collection development guidelines or policy. The Library will make available one-time, lump sums for support of new programs and new faculty members’ area of specialization within the curriculum. Academic departments are encouraged to work with the librarian in their schools or the Collection Development Librarian when purchasing materials.

3. Licensing agreements should be consistent with the Library Bill of Rights, and should maximize access.

4. Textbooks. As a general rule the Library does not purchase textbooks and workbooks for the collection with the exception of materials that comprise the K-12 curriculum collection maintained on behalf of the School of Education. Maintaining a textbook collection is unsustainable as textbooks are frequently updated and often expensive. Students are expected to purchase or lease the necessary textbooks for their courses. However, the Library is willing to consider the purchase of electronic textbooks, when we can obtain an unlimited use license from the publisher, or work with faculty to identify open educational resources (OER) for use in their courses.

5. Periodicals. Because periodicals represent an ongoing cost, and are often significantly impacted by higher than normal inflation, the Library is currently operating under a policy that no new periodical subscriptions can be added to the collection unless one of equivalent cost is cancelled.

6. Single copies. Due to budgetary and space constraints the Library limits purchases to a single copy of a print publication. The Library will consider purchasing multiple use licenses of electronic books, however.

7. Materials request deadline. Academic departments are required to submit orders and spend their allocations no later than March 15 each year. The Library is responsible for spending all funds outside those allotted to the departments as well as any remaining funds after March 15.

8. Donations. The Library is no longer accepting donations of printed books or journals. This policy is due to the high cost of storing, reviewing, and processing donations. It is often more cost effective to purchase new titles than to review older titles that too often duplicate existing copies in the collection. There are three exceptions to this policy:

  1. The College Archives welcomes materials that document the history of the College and the people associated with the College.
  2. Donations of unique and rare materials may be considered for placement in the collection.
  3. Donations of new books authored by members of the CSS community.

9. Point of need collection development. There are times when it makes sense to purchase an item outright when a request to borrow an item is made. This is often referred to as “purchase on demand or patron-driven acquisition” collection development. The Library will consider purchasing books requested through interlibrary loan if they match the following criteria:

  • Scholarly in nature
  • Not a textbook
  • Published in English
  • Published within the last five years
  • Not already owned by the CSS Library
  • Easily accessible
  • Cost under $100
  • Must not be specialized in nature. They should be general enough for use by multiple students.
  • No videos, DVDs, CDs, magazines/journals, or software

10. Collection analysis. Analysis of the collection is conducted for specific subject areas in conjunction with the academic program review process or by request from an academic department.

11. Weeding. Given our space constraints we cannot keep all the materials we purchase. The focus of the collection is on the current curriculum and research needs of the institution. Because of these limitations the Library must remove materials from the collection to make space for additional materials needed to support the curriculum. At CSS weeding is an ongoing process which can be done in a number of ways. Weeding can be performed by subject, by format, by collection, by duplicate copy(ies), by space needs, by item condition, by currency of material, or when an item is lost. Criteria for weeding will change depending on the goal. Faculty will be consulted when input is needed in their disciplines.

12. Removal of deselected materials. Materials which have been selected for removal can be disposed of in any number of ways. The Library will attempt to reduce the environmental impact of its removed materials by minimizing what is taken to the trash. The following steps will be taken in this order:

  1. Offer deselected material to Better World Books, or a similar outlet.
  2. Offer deselected materials to the CSS and greater community by means of a book sale.
  3. Recycle items that remain.

Appendix A. Formats and Criteria for Selection
General criteria for all formats: The following will be considered when selecting materials for the Library’s collection: relevance to the curriculum, appropriateness to the primary users (language, format, audience, etc.), favorable reviews, author/publisher reputation, cost, recommended in bibliographies, importance to a discipline, organization of material, currency, and accuracy.

Formats:

  1. Books. The preferred format of physical books is paperback over cloth, unless cloth is better suited for the collection (e.g. reference books). Print is preferred when the expected use of the item is relatively low or at the Duluth campus while electronic is preferred when the expected use is high (multi-user licenses) or at other campuses/online programs. Other criteria must be considered when purchasing electronic books such as licensing terms, user friendliness, and stability of platform.
  2. Periodicals. We select electronic periodicals, when possible, over print to increase access and decrease the physical footprint of the collection. Exceptions to this preference are made when a title is not available electronically, the cost of electronic access is prohibitive, or the electronic version is not an accurate representation of the print.
  3. Audiovisual materials. DVDs are the preferred format for video. We discourage faculty from using VHS, which is quickly becoming obsolete. Blu-ray will be purchased only when DVD is not available. CDs are the preferred format for music and sound recordings.
  4. Electronic Resources. Subscriptions to electronic databases are made using many of the same criteria as other materials. Licensing terms, copyright, interlibrary loan privileges, platform user friendliness, ease of access, and usage statistics are all considered.
  5. Board games. The Library maintains a small collection of board and card games for members of the community to use.

Borrowers assume total liability for items checked out from the St. Scholastica Library or borrowed through Interlibrary Loan. This includes responsibility for payment for lost, damaged or mutliated items. Borrowers are responsible for making sure that items are properly returned for discharge from the Library's circulation system. The responsibility and liability remain with the borrower until the item is properly checked in.  Note: The Library Reserves the right to recall any materials after 3 weeks.

Check Out Privileges
For Books
Undergraduate students  - four weeks
Graduate students - one semester
Staff - one semester
Adjunct professors - one semester
Professors - until June 1

For Audio-Visual Materials
Undergraduate students  - one week
Graduate students - one week
Staff - one week
Adjunct professors - one week
Professors - until June 1

Reserve Items
Must abide by reserve limits or by special loan. Most items are for 2-hour in-library use or for one or three days.

Periodicals
Faculty only - one week

Reference Books
Special loans only

STUDENT TESTS IN THE LIBRARY ARE NOT PROCTORED.

Closed-book tests will be administered in the conference room ONLY. Students will be placed in the room with approved materials (pen, paper, calculator), only--please be sure to specify on your test instructions. 

Limits:
Tests may be administered by a library staff member (not student workers). 
Monday - Friday 8:30 am - 4:00 p.m. [tests must end by 4:00].
Saturday and Sunday - No tests administered.

Please do not pre-approve a time for an exam with your student unless you check with the Library first.

Only one student at one time may take a closed-book exam in the Library. The student is required to reserve a time by filling out the Schedule a test form on the library homepage. 

The Library also reserves the right to use the conference room for non-test purposes.

The Library staff is responsible solely for handing out the test (recording the time if needed) and collecting it afterward, not for anything else, e.g. determining if the student receives help. 

Library staff is not responsible for troubleshooting technical issues with online exams. If laptops crash and passwords do not work. The student will be asked to reschedule. 

The faculty must fill out the Exam Instructions Form. Faculty must bring paper tests to the Library in clearly marked envelopes with the student's name and the faculty member's name. The faculty must pick up completed tests. 

 

Any Library materials not returned by the due date and time are subject to increasing fines.

Three overdue notices are sent via email to the student's CSS email account. Billing notices will be sent to the campus box or to a home address if campus is not open prior to billing at the Business Office. Students are responsible for responding to their email and maintaining a current address with the registrar.

If materials have not been returned after the third notice is received, the student is billed for the accrued fines and replacement cost of the items plus a $15 processing fee per item.

This amount is transferred to the student's account at the Business Office. If the lost items are returned within the academic year, the student's account will be credited with the replacement cost, but the $15 processing fee and fine remains.

Holds are placed on the student's records for transcripts, grades, and registration if books are overdue and remain until all fines and replacement charges are either paid or transferred to the Business Office.

The College of St. Scholastica Library's mission is first to support the College's curriculum and to provide resources to CSS students, faculty and staff but welcomes visitors and local users. Library staff will be happy to assist any patron with questions. Hours are posted at the entrance, on flyers and on the Library hours web page.

All non-CSS borrowers are required to show proof of identification such as a driver's license, student ID card, etc. There is a $15.00 annual fee for cards issued to local community residents; there is no charge for area college students or faculty.

Books can be checked out for four weeks. Only area college faculty are also able to check out audio visual materials. Other items excluded from circulation include laptop computers, reference books, periodicals, course reserves, and masters thesis and projects.

Public access computers are available for access to the Internet in order to use the catalog and databases to find books and articles for research. Printing from these computers is 5 cents a page.  

Other resources available in the Library include photocopiers for 10 cents a page and TV's with DVD and VHS players. 

Intellectual Freedom
The Library, like the College, was founded in the Catholic, Benedictine tradition. As such it is committed to developing and providing access to a collection representing a diversity of views. It is this sort of diverse collection that fosters intellectual inquiry and develops critical thinking skills. The development of library collections in support of an institution’s instruction and research programs should transcend the personal values of the selector. In the interests of research and learning, it is essential that collections contain materials representing a variety of perspectives on subjects that may, at times, be considered controversial.

The Library adheres to the academic library interpretation of the Library Bill of Rights as articulated by the American Library Association (http://www.ala.org/advocacy/intfreedom/librarybill):

The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.

IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.

V. A person’s right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.

VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

VII. All people, regardless of origin, age, background, or views, possess a right to privacy and confidentiality in their library use. Libraries should advocate for, educate about, and protect people’s privacy, safeguarding all library use data, including personally identifiable information.

Challenges to the Collection
In the event that someone objects to certain materials in the Library collection, a complaint may be reported to the Collection Development Librarian. The Collection Development Librarian, in consultation with other librarians, will attempt to resolve the issue; however, the material will remain available on the shelf until a final determination has been made by the Collection Development Librarian or Director of the Library if necessary.

Pandemic Emergency Plan

College of St. Scholastica Library


In the event that a significant percentage of Library faculty and staff are unable to come to work because of illness, or the College closes or is quarantined due to an emergency such as a natural disaster or pandemic, Library operations may be affected in the following ways:

 

1)  Online Resources: the most essential Library services during an extended period of closure are online resources. These are the issues associated with their continued operations:

 

a) Online catalog - ScholasticaCat (OPAC):  St. Scholastica Person Responsible:  Laura Hoelter, Cataloging/Systems Librarian, (218)723-6141; lhoelter@css.edu

 

The CSS Library’s integrated library system, Alma, is maintained jointly by MnPALS and St. Scholastica.  It is possible to perform focused searches in the catalog for electronic books which are owned by the Library.

 

MnPALS Support Center (507-389-2000): https://www.mnpals.org/support/using-the-pals-support-center/

    

b) Databases and Library web site: St. Scholastica Person Responsible:  Todd White Reference/Electronic Resources Librarian, (218) 723-6473; twhite@css.edu

 

Database problems typically occur in two areas - the St. Scholastica server may have problems (especially if a vendor has changed the web address for a database) or the database vendor may be experiencing problems. The St. Scholastica connection to the Internet is managed by Information Technologies. Off campus access to all library databases (including the catalog) relies on a functional connection to the Internet. For IT-related issues first contact Christine Pasek, System Administrator, (218) 723-7007; cpasek@css.edu. If the System Administrator is not available contact the IT Help Desk at (218) 723-5911; helpdesk@css.edu.

 

It is possible to update the Library’s web site from off campus to reflect any changes necessary in services during an extended period of closure. Changes made to the web site will be tailored to the type of emergency that is triggering the closure.

 

c)  Online Reference Service: St. Scholastica Person Responsible: Julie Rustad, Distance Education Librarian, (218) 723-6535; jrustad@css.edu.

 

Reference service will be maintained, although at a reduced level, during a period of extended closure by using College email and online reference through Zoom, available at: https://css.zoom.us/j/906527611  

 

d) Interlibrary Loan (ILL): St. Scholastica Person Responsible: Angie Mason, Library Assistant, (218) 723-6178; amason2@css.edu

 

If the event leading to the closure is localized, or service from MINITEX (our primary ILL provider/mediator) is not affected, ILL will continue to process requests as long as they can be filled by electronic means. This likely means requests for periodical articles are likely to be filled whereas requests for monographs (books and videos) will not likely be filled.

 

e) Library Instruction: St. Scholastica Person Responsible: Heidi Johnson, First Year/Information Literacy Librarian, (218) 723-6488; hjohnso2@css.edu.  

 

Presentations already scheduled may be able to still occur upon arrangement with the Librarian, faculty member, and the students through Zoom. The Librarian already scheduled to present will communicate with the faculty member to pursue this option.

 

If faculty wish to schedule a presentation, they should contact Heidi, and she will communicate with the other librarians to determine who is best able to do the presentation through Zoom. 

 

2) Library Building Operation

 

As long as St. Scholastica students, faculty and staff remain on campus, the Library will attempt to maintain at least some operating hours. 

 

a)  If the campus is closed due to a pandemic or natural disaster situation, the Library building will close as well. Except for some monitoring of the Alma system and online databases, no on-campus Library staff services will be maintained.

 

b)  If some members of the St. Scholastica community are quarantined on campus, the Library (utilizing closed stacks) may open for limited hours using student assistants (and quarantined faculty/staff, if available) in conjunction with campus security. Under such circumstances, Library faculty/staff will establish an on call system that would provide telephone or electronic reference support from home to Library student assistants and patrons. A basic manual of circulation operations will be available at the circulation desk to assist those persons managing the Library.

 

c)  If St. Scholastica serves as a general quarantine site for non-St. Scholastica people (temporarily ending the college function), the Library will remain closed.

 

Appendix A

 

PERSON-IN-CHARGE LIST

 

Official contact, Library Director: Kevin McGrew, (218) 723-6198; kmcgrew@css.edu

 

If the Library Director is unavailable, the person-in-charge list should be used to identify the responsible Library contact. During an emergency, communication lines will be maintained through an appointed small group who will manage contact between the Library and other St. Scholastica departments.

 

Choose the first available person from this list:

Todd White, Reference/Electronic Resources Librarian, office phone (218) 723-6473; twhite@css.edu

Laura Hoelter, Cataloging/Systems Librarian, office phone (218) 723-6141; lhoelter@css.edu

Heidi Johnson, First Year/Information Literacy Librarian, office phone (218) 723-6488; hjohnso2@css.edu

Julie Rustad, Distance Education Librarian, office phone (218) 723-6535; jrustad@css.edu

Brad Snelling, Periodicals/Collection Development Librarian, office phone (218) 723-6644; bsnellin@css.edu

Jennifer Lund, Access Services Librarian/Student Worker Supervisor, office phone (218) 723-6140; jlund1@css.edu.

Julie Walkowiak, Library Assistant (Acquisitions), office phone (218) 723-6649; jwalkowi@css.edu.

Angie Mason, Library Assistant (Interlibrary Loan), office phone (218) 723-6178; amason2@css.edu.

 

Student workers are responsible for contacting a librarian or library staff member if any problems arise. They should first try to contact the Access Services Librarian who will determine the extent of the problem and contact the Library Director should the situation require it. If the Access Services Librarian  cannot be reached, they should contact the Library Director and begin working down the person-in-charge list.

 

Policy created: January, 2012

Policy updated: February, 2020