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Medieval & Renaissance Studies: Books

This guide consists of a listing of materials available either in The St. Scholastica Library or available through The St. Scholastica Library for students taking classes in our Medieval & Renaissance Studies Minor.

Scholasticat

ScholastiCAT

"Scholaticat" [decorative capital S ] - thought to be the earliest known representation of Scholasticat from the apocryphal Vita Sancti Finnei Radii (Life of St. Finneus the Radiant), as mentioned in the apocryphal Liber Canis Parvi Caerulei [Book of the Little Blue Dog]. Collectively, these two lost books are known as the "Blarney Manuscripts."

Do not use this image without permission from Todd White.

The OED

The Oxford English Dictionary is definitive history of the English language. The multi-volume print set will not longer be published, with all updates now occurring in the online version.

Getting started with books

The printed book created the modern world. For your research, they provide you with the depth to explore a topic at length - neither the overview of an encyclopedia nor the tight focus of a journal article. 

Borrowing books from other libraries

People still speak of the Internet "freeing" information. But not everything a futurist dreams comes to fruition. Copyright law restricts the lending of ebooks. However, libraries have hundreds of years of history of lending printed books, and we still do it today. As a CSS student you have access to almost every library in the state. If you can give us a week, we can open the door for you to over 5 million printed books.

Special collections

Books in the public domain

As a rule, any book published before the 1920s is not protected by copyright and has moved into the public domain. Various entities have developed projects to digitize these books.

For books under copyright, Google has made sections available for preview. Remember, good scholars might want to actually look at the entire book for a paper. Use the library catalogs listed above, and InterLibrary Loan if need be, to acquire a copy of the book.

Other local libraries