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Copyright: Best Practices for Teaching

Copyright guidelines for faculty, staff, and students at CSS.

Teaching Scenarios

Professor Snow would like to show a variety of films in his face-to-face course. He is able to locate several of them in the Library. In addition, his department owns a couple. However, he cannot find a copy of one very important video on the campus. The good news is that he has a copy of the film that he purchased a few years ago. Can he show all the films in his class?

Using Content in Teaching

Faculty often ask questions about using certain types of content in the face-to-face classroom and in Blackboard. The table below will provide general guidance and options for using different types of sources as well as different format types while teaching in different classroom environments.

 

Type Face-to-face Classroom Online Classroom
Book

Physical books can be displayed, shared, used, and read from in the face-to-face classroom. (See Classroom exemption)

Entire books cannot be scanned or photocopied.

Put the physical book on Reserve in the Library.

Entire books cannot be scanned and uploaded to an online course.

Link to ebooks in the CSS Library collection. If the Library does not have the ebook you need, contact one of the Librarians to see if it is available for purchase. 

Book Chapter

Displaying or reading a book chapter from the physical book in the face-to-face classroom is fine. (See Classroom exemption)

Sharing photocopies of a book chapter with students in a class will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Put the physical book on Reserve in the Library.

Share links to ebook chapters with students in an Online Reading List, electronic reserves, or syllabus. 

Place on electronic Reserves (the Library follows best practices for electronic reserves).

CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 

Scanning and uploading a book chapter to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Share links to ebook chapters from the CSS ebook collections within your online course, in an Online Reading list, or electronic reserves. 

Poems, Plays, Scripts, etc.

Poems, plays, scripts can be displayed, read, or performed in the face-to-face classroom. (See Classroom Exemption)

Sharing photocopies of poems, plays, scripts, etc. with students in a class will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Put physical poems, plays, scripts, etc. on Reserve in the Library. 

CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 

Scanning and uploading poems, plays, scripts, etc. to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Share links to poems, plays, scripts, etc. from the CSS Library collections within your online course, in an Online Reading list, or electronic reserves.

Article

Displaying or reading an article in the face-to-face classroom is fine. (See Classroom Exemption)

Sharing photocopies of articles with students in a class will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Put the journal on Reserve in the Library.

CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 

Scanning and uploading an article to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Share links to articles from the CSS databases within your online course, in an Online Reading list, or electronic reserves.

Images

Showing a photograph or other image in the face-to-face classroom is fine. (See Classroom Exemption)

Making copies of photographs or other images to give to students in a class will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Search the CSS Library image databases for images that might meet your needs.

Locate images with a Creative Commons license. (Creative Commons Search Engine)

Locate images in the Public Domain. (Search Pixabay, Pexels, Unsplash)

CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 

Uploading an image to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Search the CSS Library image databases for images that might meet your needs.

Locate images with a Creative Commons license. (Creative Commons Search Engine)

Locate images in the Public Domain. (Search PixabayPexelsUnsplash)

Figures

Showing a figure, chart, or table in the face-to-face classroom is fine. (See Classroom Exemption)

Some CSS LIbrary databases allow you to print tables, charts, or figures for personal use or use within an education presentation. Be sure to read the Image Usage Permission statement. 

Link to the article within CSS Library database. 

Be sure to give attribution. 

Uploading a figure to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

Link to the article within the CSS Library database. 

DVD, VHS

Showing a DVD or VHS in the face-to-face classroom is fine. (See Classroom Exemption)

The DVD or VHS must be lawfully made. 

Put DVD or VHS on Reserve in the Library.

CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 

Uploading a copy of a DVD or VHS to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

In the event your use is considered a Fair Use, it is highly recommended to use NO MORE than you absolutely need to meet your educational goal. 

Check the CSS Library Streaming video collections. If the video is not available, contact one of the Librarians to see if the streaming video is available for purchase.

 

Streaming Video from CSS Library Collections

Most videos in our streaming video collections can be shown in class. 

Add links for videos to your syllabus.

Link videos in course LibGuide. 

 

Videos from the CSS collections can be linked or embedded in an online course. 
YouTube, VimeoTeacherTube, etc.

Generally, it is fine to show YouTube, Vimeo, TeacherTube, etc. videos in a face-to-face course. 

Add links for videos to your syllabus.

Link videos in course LibGuide.

Be sure to give attribution to the author or creator. 

Do not use any videos that you suspect may not be a legal copy. 

Generally, it is fine to link or embed YouTube, Vimeo, TeacherTube, etc. videos in an online course. 

Be sure to give attribution to the author or creator. 

Do not use any videos that you suspect may not be a legal copy. 

NetFlix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc. 

Generally, licenses from NetFlix, Hulu, Amazon Prime, etc. are for personal use only. They should not be used in a face-to-face course. 

Most students have subscriptions to their own accounts to access films, documentaries, etc.  

Most students have subscriptions to their own accounts to access films, documentaries, etc.
Music (CDs, LPs, cassettes, etc.)

Music from CDs, LPs, cassettes, etc. can be played in the face-to-face classroom. (See Classroom Exemption)

Put Music on Reserve in the Library.

Locate music with a Creative Commons license. (Creative Commons Search Engine)

CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 

Uploading music to an online course will require a Fair Use analysis. (Learn more about Fair Use)

In the event your use is considered a Fair Use, it is highly recommended to use NO MORE than you absolutely need to meet your educational goal. 

Check the CSS Library Streaming music collections.

 

Streaming Music from CSS Library Collections

Generally, playing music from the CSS Library music collections is fine. 

Create playlists for students to listen to.

Add links to music to your syllabus.

Link music in online course guide. 

It is fine to link to music from the CSS Library streaming music collections. 
Live Music Performance Live music performances are fine in the face-to-face classroom. (See Classroom Exemption) CSS does not have all the requirements in place to fall under the TEACH Act exemption. 
Websites

Generally, it is fine to show websites in the face-to-face classroom.

Add links to websites on your syllabus.

Link websites in online course guide. 

Generally, it is fine to link to websites in your online course. 
Sending content via email Generally, when sending content via email to your students, it is better to link to content rather than sending an attachment or a copy. Generally, when sending content via email to your students, it is better to link to content rather than sending an attachment or a copy.
Sending content via social media

Generally, there is an implied license with content that is shared on social media. Most users expect that content will be shared within the social media environment. Therefore, it is generally fine to share content with students in your class using the Share feature from the social media platform you found it on. 

Link to other content when sharing with your students. 

Give attribution to author or creator when appropriate. 

Generally, there is an implied license with content that is shared on social media. Most users expect that content will be shared within the social media environment. Therefore, it is generally fine to share content with students in your class using the Share feature from the social media platform you found it on. 

Link to other content when sharing with your students. 

Give attribution to author or creator when appropriate. 

Student work (papers, projects, etc.) Students own the copyright of all work they create, including work they create for an assignment. If you want to use the work outside the course or for other purposes, secure permission from the student in writing. Be very specific about how you want to use the item and how long you would like to use it. In addition, be sure to keep the permission documentation within your records.  Students own the copyright of all work they create, including work they create for an assignment. If you want to use the work outside the course or for other purposes, secure permission from the student in writing. Be very specific about how you want to use the item and how long you would like to use it. In addition, be sure to keep the permission documentation within your records.
Student work created in student worker position

The College owns the copyright for content created by students as part of a College job (ex. student workers). It is generally fine to show or use this content within your face-to-face class. 

Be sure to provide attribution.

Contact the Department where the student worked if you would like to use the content for other purposes. 

The College owns the copyright for content created by students as part of a College job (ex. student workers). It is generally fine to show or use this content within your online course. 

Be sure to provide attribution.

Contact the Department where the student worked if you would like to use the content for other purposes.

 

(Adapted from Portland State University Copyright Guide: https://guides.library.pdx.edu/copyright-guidance/teaching)

 

 

Questions?

The table is not fully inclusive of all the possibilities for different types of resources or the formats of these items. In addition, it only highlights the traditional face-to-face classroom and online courses as well as standard options or exemptions for both teaching environments. 

  • Do you have questions about content types or formats not listed in the table? 
  • Do you have questions about using content types or formats outside the classroom environment?
  • Do you have questions about exceptions or options not listed in the table?

If you have answered YES to any of these questions, please contact Julie Rustad or the CSS Library for questions and guidance.

Legal Advice Disclaimer

The information presented in this guide is intended for informational and educational purposes only. It is not offered as legal advice or counsel. Faculty, staff, students, and others associated with the college should consult an attorney for advice concerning their individual copyright situations and needs.